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Few Observations About Prospects And Freelance Talents


Our association with the Asia’s biggest book fair is now four years old. We have observed publishers, freelancers closely during our participation in the Fair. Here are few of views of them

By Yojana Parekh

Meeting hundreds of freelancers in the fields of translation, content writing, graphics designing and so on is one thrilling thing for us at the New Delhi World Book Fair. Another such thing is realising that so many publishers, writers and others need our services. That is because we are one of a kind company providing several media services under one roof. Yet, converting prospects, both freelance talents and service seekers, into an associate or a client is not an easy task. Here are reasons behind that:

  • Cost: Indian publishers somehow manages to find writers, translators, even typesetters and proofreaders at an unbelievable low price. Maybe the unorganized nature of the business goes in their favour. So, it becomes little difficult to convince them to opt for systematic, organized and highly professional services.

  • Traditional business: While we are seeing an influx of modern, well-managed and professional publishers, most of them deal with the English language. The business of Indian languages are still run by traditional firms. It’s not easy to change their mindset, even if a new and forward thinking generation has taken reins of business.

  • Underestimating future: Progressive India and coming closer of different languages in the country is yet to be properly envisioned by many publishers. So, they follow predetermined route of publication, playing safe publishing books that they feel easy to sell. They are yet to realize the fact that their existing content holds a huge potential if they make it available in various Indian languages.   

We have observed these and other issues act as hurdles in converting prospects into clients. We are still hopeful that things would change with the passage of time.

Coming to freelancers, here are our observations:

  • Numerous freelancers visit our and other stalls. Many of them are aspirants, and a handful, professionals. There is a class of in-betweens too, who want to employ their talent for earning purpose, but their eagerness must be getting fizzled out as soon as they leave the Fair.

  • It’s not easy to find out right and responsible freelancers. Not just in our business, but in all businesses in India. Our toughest task has been evaluating freelancers we meet at such fairs, understanding their quality, discipline and commitment before absorbing them in our force of 700+ freelancers.

  • If freelancers work with complete seriousness and focus, we firmly believe that lakhs of Indians would be able to earn handsomely sitting at home and working at their wish.       

See you again, tomorrow!  

(Visit Mangrol Multimedia at NBT World Book Fair 2019

HALL 12A STALL 318. To find us at Pragati Maidan, call us on 9773562241)

(Yojana is a part of team Mangrol that is participating at NBT WBF 2019)

 

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